Friday Free-For-All #4

It’s me again, with another topic for discussion. This one is always a two-edged sword, and I look forward to your comments.

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The topic for today is Social Media.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

The dictionary gives this definition of social media: websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking.

I often ask myself if participating on social media platforms is a complete waste of my time and effort. Is there one platform that is more sound and effective than another? Where do we go from here? Is there a point where we throw in the social media towel?

It’s a convoluted maze.

I have attended many author marketing conferences through the years, and every marketing expert drove home the concept that in order to be a successful author, you must have a strong social media presence. So, I believed them. And I worked hard to establish a social media presence.

Now, I hear of some authors who have no social media presence at all and still sell books. Teri Polen recently shared a blog post about her author friend who does not participate in any form of social media. I’m not going to reiterate that post, so if you missed it, you can take a look at it here. Coffee With Larry and An Unexpected Surprise.

Perhaps Larry found the magic solution to hitting a bestseller list.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Then again, it may not work the same way next time.

That is the other frustrating part about all social media. In one instance, I will have a gangbusters book launch with great sales, and the next time, using the same formula, hardly sell anything at all.

I am on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest, TikTok (although not for long), and maintain my website and blog. That’s a LOT!

But what do I drop? Each platform has its strengths. Likewise, each platform has its downside.

I like Facebook for keeping up with family and friends. I have both a personal and an author page. I often consider deleting one of them, but so far, haven’t.

I like Twitter for short blasts. I also like Twitter because you can follow your favorite celebrities (if you have any.) I follow some mainstream authors just because I think I might learn from them.

I use Instagram the least because it all has to be done on my phone, and to be honest, I don’t always remember to take photos to share.

I use Pinterest as sort of a storage facility. I save blogs I want to refer back to along with images for future projects.

I put book trailers up on YouTube and have put a lot of Rick’s music on that platform.

I never use LinkedIn, although my blog posts are automatically shared on that platform.

I got a TikTok account because it was the hottest new platform for advertising my books. However, I don’t think it is for me. I am not that good at putting together great videos, and that’s what it’s all about.

I will always continue to maintain my blog and website. If I were forced to choose, those would be the two I would most definitely keep.

I truly am baffled and overwhelmed by all these platforms, and trying to keep current and relevant on each. So, which ones do I drop? Which ones do I give the most attention to?

Should I stop it all?

These are all things I ask myself.

So far, I’ve done a total of 19 Book Marketing posts at Story Empire. I’ve explored a lot of different avenues, spent hard-earned money on each, and shared my thoughts and results. As I look back on it, I’m left to wonder if I learned anything at all. Did I draw any concrete conclusions?

I feel like I’m searching for a holy grail that doesn’t exist. I don’t think there is a single magic bullet to selling our books via social media platforms. What works today might not work tomorrow, and vice-versa.

Keeping up with it all gets exhausting at times.

If you’ve found a solution to managing social media platforms, I’d love to hear from you. Let’s share.

63 thoughts on “Friday Free-For-All #4

  1. I’m with you, Jan. It’s a perplexing mix of opinions and results. Some people put all of their energy into one platform, and others spread themselves out more. Personally, I stick to three mains: Instagram, WordPress, and Twitter. My website records the number of visits I get from each platform, and also from direct Google searches, etc. It does not record actual book sales, so who really knows.

    What I’ve found is that the numbers will shift constantly, and often dramatically, with no particular platform being dominant. What works today, won’t work tomorrow. So to me, it just seems like a guessing game. Maybe it’s just a case of the right people viewing the platform at the right time. Sorry, I wish I had some solid advice for you, but I do feel your pain.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you nailed it, Mark, when you said it’s a guessing game. It truly is. No one has the answers because I feel they are as individual as we are. Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing your experience!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The golden question for us writers. I’m finding a lot of my writing friends focusing on the blog and guest posts and overwhelmed with SM. I’m drained from it. I haven’t visited my Pinterest or Insta pages in YEARS. I stick with Fakebook because I connect with writing friends and groups, Twitter for great sharing, and LinkedIn for sharing, but I don’t get too involved. We could waste a whole day there and the writing suffers. I heard Insta is worse than it’s cohort Fakebook for getting hacked πŸ™‚ x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There is no platform that is safe from hackers, and that’s a fact. I do think some are worse than others, though. It’s all hard. It’s a juggling act and can consume our lives if we don’t find a way to manage it. Thank you so much for weighing in, Debby!

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  3. Hi Jan!
    I am so glad to read this post because just last week I was journaling about how I feel like a slacker when it comes to online stuff and social media!
    My journaling helped me see that I am not a complete Slacker because I maintain my blog and connect that way! It alosbhekled me realize that I left other social media platforms for legit reasons – not being lazy or inactive – but intentional because I was guarding my engagement and also my energy!
    -/
    And with certain social media sites I just don’t have a groove and that is something I should accept and not feel bad about it!
    Like I never ever found the twitter groove!
    Yet I know so many folks who find that their main thing! One guy even shared how twitter content impacts culture (and not always the other way around) and he said he that twitter was his main thing (like Elon Musk and others) but I like how you say it has value for blasts (and I know it can be fun for quick quips during current events or sports)
    -/
    Oh and regarding tik tok – another reason to consider moving away from it is because they have sketchy privacy practices and they are owned by China. This might not mean much – but I know someone who recently did not buy a New Volvo because the company is owned by China and this person worried about what might be hidden in the tech of the car! Sounds a little paranoid but this person works in the tech field and made some plausible points!

    Okay – enough from me!
    I enjoyed what you wrote as your shared from your heart about social media options!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your input, Yvette. I’ve heard several folks say the same thing about TikTok and its connection to China. And it is a legitimate concern. Privacy in this technology-driven age is something that has disappeared. Even the most careful and cautious have little privacy. I think the general consensus here is that our blog is our best resource and I do agree. It’s such a double-edged sword. I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to stop by and leave a comment. It’s always great to get input from some in the tech field about ‘tech’ issues!

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  4. Thanks so much for mentioning my post, Jan! There doesn’t seem to be a magic formula for social media. I use my blog, Twitter, FB, and Instagram, but I have no idea if any of it impacts my book sales. I create pics for Instagram on Canva, then forget to post them, lol.
    On the positive side, I sure love interacting with the people I’ve met online!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Great post, Jan, and great question. For myself, I loved blogging long before I started writing. I’ve been at it since before they were called “blogs.” (They were mostly referred to as bulletin boards in those days, some 20+ years ago). I don’t plan to give up blogging ever, and I suspect I’ll keep The Write Stuff active, even if I never write another word, because I SO enjoy the writing and blogging friends I’ve made there. And I’d continue to share posts from those good folks on their latest releases, promos, etc, even if I never write another book, myself.

    I closed my Facebook account when I got hacked, and someone pretending to be me was contacting all my friends and asking for money. I’ve never had the nerve to go back, though I used it mainly for keeping in touch with family and friends. I’m thinking of getting back to using Pinterest again for several reasons that aren’t especially geared toward marketing. I do tweet all my TWS posts and writing news, and I share posts from other authors on Twitter, too.

    But I’ve never done any real marketing of any sort, and am seriously considering trying a few paid ads here and there, just to see what happens. Not sure about that yet. My honest feeling (and what I’ve often read) is that the best way to sell books is to keep writing new ones, so that’s what I’m MOSTLY hoping to accomplish as my health improves a bit more.

    I wish there were a Magic Button somewhere that would take this off our shoulders so we can focus all our creativity on writing, but I haven’t heard of one. (If I find one, I’ll let you and everybody else I know, in on it immediately!) In the meantime, happy writing, my friend! And here’s to lots and lots of new readers finding us all through one avenue or another.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your comment, Marcia. I think the general consensus from all of us is that we’d want to continue blogging no matter what else we drop or keep. I agree. If and when you decide to try some ads, refer back to my Story Empire marketing posts and hopefully, they’ll help a little. It’s hard to maneuver the maze. I do think one of the best marketing strategies is to keep putting out new books. I wish you absolute success in all that you do!

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      1. Thanks, Jan, and I’ve saved ALL of your marketing posts for referral when I’m ready to give that a go. It was a great series, for sure, and will be very helpful to a marketing newbie like me.

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  6. I’ve bailed out on 99% of it. I enjoy my blog, and SE, but have even trimmed that back from five days per week to about one. I know some people check out for the weekend, but that’s about the only time I have available to post anything. I worked Twitter and Facebook pretty hard at one point and they sold some books for me. Eventually, I assessed the hours per sale and it wasn’t worth it. I have my blog auto feed to many platforms, and interact with those who want to say something on them. I’m with John in many ways. I love writing, and hope a few people enjoy my stories. I can’t see throwing a ton of money or man-hours at promotion unless it produces something.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you’re right, Craig. It’s not only expensive but discouraging when we throw money into advertising and get only minimal sales. I do think both Twitter and Facebook can help sell books, but it requires consistent work, and to be honest, I’m tired of trying to keep up. I’m still on the fence about letting my author Facebook page go. If I do, I forfeit any chance to run FB ads in the future. It would be so nice if we could afford to hire social media people to do all of this for us so we could just do the part we love – the creative part of writing. Unfortunately, I don’t have the funds. It’s amazing to me that you are able to publish as much as you do, still working full-time five days a week. You should give yourself a pat on the back! Thanks for stopping by and chiming in!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m certainly not an expert when it comes to this area. I’ve always come from a place where I try to learn from those who seem to have some degree of success. The problem is what works for one person is less effective for others. Like you, I keep two Facebook accounts. In a lot of ways it feels like authors throw stuff against the wall and see what sticks. As you pointed out, there’s no guarantee that the same thing will happen the next time.

    Perhaps this is naive, but I still think the main focus has to be on the writing. The social media stuff may be important but to a lesser degree.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. You make a good point, Pete. If we never have a new book to put out to the world, it’s harder to keep trying to sell old ones. New blood generates new interest and possibly new readers. Thank you so much for stopping by and leaving a comment!

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  8. How I wish I had the answer, Jan, but I think we all are trapped in the same dilemma. I will say that I ditched Facebook years ago and it had no impact on my book sales. These days I’m online less, but when I am, I concentrate on my blog. I still use Twitter to share, but that’s really the only other social media platform I invest time in.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I can definitely understand ditching a platform that doesn’t yield anything. My biggest reason for keeping FB is to stay in touch with family and friends I don’t get to see often. I agree about the importance of our blogs. I think they are the cornerstone to our platforms, and as Teri pointed out, I have met some amazing people through the blogging world that I wouldn’t have otherwise met. Thank you for chiming in! If I ever find a magic bullet, I’ll be sharing it with everyone!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree that blogs are the cornerstone of all we build. Like you I’ve connected with so many wonderful friends through blogging that I would have never known otherwise. Even if I stop everything else, I hope to never stop making rounds in the blogosphere!

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  9. No silver bullet here either, Jan. I only have my blog (and website). I could do all social media platforms poorly or I could do one well, and I chose to focus on my blog. Your marketing series has been quite informative and I’ve followed up on some of your ideas where there isn’t a huge time-suck (submitted to 3 contests yesterday, for example). When you discover the silver bullet, let me know! πŸ˜€

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    1. Whoo hoo, Diana!! I am thrilled that my marketing post inspired you to enter some contests! You have a fabulous book to enter. I like your approach to choosing what you can devote the time to and do well. That is an excellent way to handle it. Thank you for stopping by and weighing in today!

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  10. I don’t think social media is as important as writing a quality book. I use the platforms to connect with family and friends these days and worry less about sales. While getting rich would be nice πŸ™‚ I don’t see it happening any time soon, so I’m going to relax and let go of the stress.

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    1. That is the best idea I’ve heard so far today, Jacquie! We can’t let social media rule our lives, or run our lives. And if we spend all our time on SM, we never get our books written. Thank you for your comment!

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    2. Hi Jan, I see this post has garnered a lot of comments. I like blogging. I enjoy the community, I like reading all sorts of different posts including ones like this, book reviews, baking and cooking posts and I think blogging has expanded my social circle and view on life, especially in other countries. I use Twitter but I only link to other readers and writers. I have FB which I do enjoy. I have Instagram but I’ve cut it down because of all the videos. They annoy me, I only want the pictures. I have Pinterest but I don’t consider that a SM for my books but rather a place to save ideas that interest me for cakes or books.

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  11. An excellent post, Jan, and a nice recap of the things you are doing. The key to selling books is to have the right story put in front of the right readers enough times for them to finally buy a book. All it takes is plenty of money to find those readers and tell the message a number of times. Most of us don’t have that kind of resource so we try the social media route cause it is affordable. Not very effective but affordable. Also, the people making tons of money are those selling authors “systems” that are supposed to make social media work. I keep writing books because I like to do that. The expectation of selling a ton of them is zero.

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    1. You nailed it, John. It does take money to push the books to the masses, and as Indie authors, we simply don’t have those resources. And those selling authors the “fail-proof systems” are the ones making the money. The truth is, there is no magic bullet aside from getting picked up by one of the Big 5 publishing houses and having them push it. Mae’s post on SE today says it all. If we don’t have a passion for telling stories, then we need to find something else to do. You always bring such a practical approach to every situation, John! Thank you!

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  12. I wish there was a simple answer to promoting, Jan. I have kept all my accounts so far because I put a lot of work into building them up. I will keep Twitter and my blog because that is where I interact with other writers the most. Facebook is mostly for family, Instagram is where my son posts, and pintrest and Linkedin I rarely use but am still there. I do like Bookbub for reviews. I have tried ads with little success on Twitter, Facebook, and, Amazon. Not sure my Newsletter gets many sales, but I have developed friendships and it ties into my blog. I wonder where podcasts fits into all of this? I prefer to read information over hearing it. Social medoa is where we find our communities though so I stay.

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    1. I am the same, Denise. I have put years of time and energy into building my platforms. I too, will keep Twitter and my blog. Facebook is where I keep up with family and friends. However, if I ever want to do FB ads, I have to keep my author page. All the different platforms can serve a purpose. I struggle to find a balance with it all. I’ve tried setting a timer and only giving myself an allotted amount of time to be on SM, but then my OCD kicks in, and I am compelled to answer everyone on every platform. Sigh…It’s hard. But, also, as you pointed out, I have made some wonderful friends around the globe via social media. So, I will stay. Still on the fence about TikTok, though. Not sure I can handle one more. I think Podcasts fit into the mix, but for me, they are mostly in the moment. Seldom do I go back and try to catch a podcast I missed.

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  13. A hot topic, Miss Jan. I’m not one to do social media every single day. In fact, I can go a week or more without going over to Facebook and Twitter. I have an Instagram account but rarely post anything because the pictures and posts I design in Canva that I want to share are not on my phone. It’s difficult. Of all, I think I like Twitter best because I don’t have to babysit it like I do on Facebook. Just put something up with plenty of tags and leave. I do think I get a lot of preorders and sell a lot of books on there so definitely worth it to me. My advice to anyone is limit yourself. It’s okay if you go for days without getting on. It can run you ragged if you let it. Love you, sister.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sister, you are so right about it running you ragged if you let it. I’ve gone through periods of time where I tried to do it all and finally realized it’s impossible and I was just spinning my wheels. I also like Twitter because you don’t have to babysit it. I do try to limit my time on social media. If I don’t, I’d never get a word written. πŸ™‚ Thank you for stopping by and weighing in. Love you, too!

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  14. I’m so chuckling at your post for today, Jan. Social media can be a blessing and a curse. For the first time, I drew a line in the sand. I refused to get on board the TikTok train. LOL! I’m on Facebook (also considering dumping my author page), Twitter (a huge success for me), Pinterest, Blogger, and Instagram. I joined Instagram last, simply because it was “quieter”, and I enjoyed viewing and posting pictures. Now my feed is clogged with videos. I do not have the time to view these and have deleted followers who post nothing but videos. Then there are days when I spend too much time on social media. This is precious time I should be writing.

    I did alter my social media this year. After lots of soul-searching, I don’t post much on the weekends, especially on Sunday. This break on the weekends has helped me tremendously.

    In all, I have to remember to have a presence with my readers and author friends. And it’s not all about me and my books. And you’re correct. What might work for a book release might not work with next one. I’m forever learning in this business.

    Great post, Jan! Thanks for sharing. Happy weekend! xo

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    1. Thank you for your thoughtful comment, Mary. I love that you’ve been able to make yourself step away on the weekends. That’s when I end up trying to catch up from the week on all platforms, but I love the idea of NOT doing it. I also agree that social media is about having a presence with our readers. They want to know us, not just our books. I’ve been taught that from day one and I believe it. I love Twitter because it’s so easy to maintain. Have I ever sold a book on Twitter? Maybe one or two, but honestly, I’d say most of my book sales come from blogs when I launch a new one. Regardless of what platforms I let go, I will always try to keep some sort of presence. Again, thank you for weighing in. Your comment is most appreciated!

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  15. The expression, “less is more,” comes to mind. Yesterday a blogger posted 6 posts within a few minutes time. I don’t know this writer but flooding the blogosphere or Twittersphere or whatever only elicits frustration from readers like me and not an interest in his/her books. There’s a balance we all need to consider and finding that balance is not easy for any of us. Good post, Jan. Thank you!

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    1. Agreed, Gwen! I have a hard time keeping up with some bloggers that do that and mainly, they are reblogging others. There is a balance. So far, I struggle with finding it. But I know it’s there somewhere, just elusive. πŸ™‚ Thanks so much for leaving a comment today!

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  16. I use Facebook just for the variety of author/writing groups. Twitter is fun if you want to time how long a tweet gets lost in the feed. Instagram allows for more creativity. TikTok? Haven’t tried that, although it is doubtful I will.

    Pintrest? I find it totally confusing as a platform.

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    1. Thanks for chiming in, Leon. I use Pinterest as a filing cabinet for blogs and images I want to find again later. Other than that, I don’t see much reason for it. Facebook is the best all-around platform for connecting with groups and staying in touch with family and friends. I laughed out loud at your Twitter comment. πŸ™‚ Too true! I need to be more proactive with Instagram. I just haven’t found my niche there yet. I appreciate your thoughts on this! Have a great weekend!

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  17. Like you, Jan, I’ve tried all sorts over the years with varying degrees of success and failure. One thing I’ve learnt is that these things change so quickly. I spend hours upon hours learning only for it all to change! I’m down to Twitter and my blog, and I’m not sure they make much difference at all. The biggest boost to sales, including my back-stock of older published books, is from releasing a new book. And even that is hit-and-miss, argh!

    I applaud your efforts and investment of time and money, and am grateful for all your info sharing on results. It frustrates me, too, that there’s not a magic bullet when it comes to marketing and sales … probably one reason why I dislike it so much!

    Great thoughts and questions, Jan. Thanks for sharing! Have a wonderful weekend. Hugs πŸ’•πŸ™‚

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    1. Thanks for weighing in, Harmony. Like you said, I’m not sure even a small social media presence make a difference. However, I wouldn’t have met the thousands of like-minded people across the globe if not for social media, so that is its redeeming trait. πŸ™‚ It does have the power to connect us with others. I hear a lot of folks complain about toxicity on social media platforms, and honestly, I don’t see it. Maybe because I choose not to see it. I’ve always been accused of living in the clouds. And I won’t deny it. πŸ™‚ I appreciate you and wish you a wonderful weekend as well!!

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  18. I am in the same situation (although haven’t tried TicToc) But I do feel I have made some great contacts through social media and have learned from others. My blog is my most effective social media site. I try very hard not to get caught up in too much social media time. We do need time to write as well. xo

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    1. You are right, Darlene! I wouldn’t have met you and a whole list of other wonderful people, if not for social media. So it does have its usefulness. I think it’s a matter of using it wisely and not letting it take over because it has a tendency to do that. Thank you so much for adding to this conversation!

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  19. I’ve cut back on the number of social media platforms. I mostly use Twitter to share other writers’ posts, etc. Facebook is for keeping up with family and friends. I deleted my Linked In account because they constantly inundated me with emails, ignoring my settings. (I also started marking them as spam.) Never used that platform anyway.

    Social media is good for somethings, but it can suck the life out of someone.

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    1. You nailed it with your last sentence, Joan. Social media is good for some things, but it can certainly be a big time suck. I have considered deleting my LinkedIn account. It pretty much just sits there, but it is also not taking anything away from me at the moment, so maybe I’ll just leave it alone. I agree about FB. I use it to keep up with family and friends that I wouldn’t have any way of keeping up with otherwise. Thanks so much for weighing in.

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  20. Let me start by applauding your efforts. Successful or not, no one can say you haven’t tried.

    My take is going to be unhelpful, but I’m feeling old and curmudgeonly today. (It’s certainly not a solution; just my opinion and observations.)

    The most successful indie authors I know have stopped using social media and scarcely use their blog. They rely on newsletters and ads. That kind of hurts my heart because I don’t want to throw good money at ads that might not convert. But I have to spend/waste the money until I learn.

    My social media presence is decreasing, and that’s by choice. I’m considering deleting Twitter. I find the main stream entirely too toxic and my personal interactions are pretty much sharing un-commented-upon blog posts combined with likes and thank-yous. That’s not a good use of my time, which is limited. I have three FB platforms: personal profile, author page, and private group. I told my group I was shutting it down (I just haven’t done that yet). My page gets automatic blog feeds and almost no engagement. I’d get rid of it, but I might start running FB ads. And my personal profile is where I keep in touch with a few people I don’t talk to in any other way. (Still, I’m considering deleting it. I almost never use FB.) I send posts to LinkedIn, and I do network on it, but not much. It’s less for my author life and more for my editing work. I’m not sure when I was last on Pinterest or Instagram, but I have those accounts, too. (BTW, you can use IG from your laptop. I have an extension in my taskbar.) That one I might think about trying again, as there are supposedly a lot of readers on there. But it seems like more work than the results will warrant.

    I’m working on my newsletter, and I’ll never get rid of my website. I’ve been blogging a lot less, and I haven’t seen a negative effect from that, either. Maybe I just don’t have the clout for my disappearance to matter. What I KNOW (rather than simply suspect) is in the past, I spent hours on social media… hours I wasn’t writing. I didn’t get sales or even contacts from those efforts, so it truly was time wasted. So, going forward, I’ll be doing much less of it. If ads and newsletters are where the best time and money are spent, I guess I’ll have to figure those out.

    SO SORRY to have hijacked your comments section! I think my answer is longer than your post! πŸ€¦β€β™€οΈ

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    1. I completely agree with you, Staci. Time on social media is time not writing. For those like myself who have a day job and family responsibilities, it was sucking me dry. My experience with FB ads was poor, but Amazon ads have proven to be worth the money. That said, I pay someone to handle the ads since I’d never find the time to learn the ins and outs of it all. As for IG, there are a lot of readers on that platform. It’s much less toxic, too.

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      1. You are smart to pay someone to do your Amazon ads for you, Jill. It is the most complex and complicated thing to set up and requires constant tweaking. I’ve had mixed results from Amazon ads, as I have also had with FB ads. Let’s face it. It’s all hard!

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    2. Lol, Staci. You are most welcome to hijack my blog posts anytime! I know people who swear by FB ads. However, without a professional page, you cannot run ads. You can’t run them from a personal page. At one time, I maintained a page for Rick Sikes Music, and I finally let that go after seven years. I can’t say that anyone has missed it in the least. I had kept it in hopes that I could continue to promote his music. It didn’t help. I do agree about Twitter. There are lots of shares, likes, and a few ‘thank yous,’ but does any of that equate to book sales? Professional marketers swear that a consistent social media presence is a must, but are they wrong? So many questions. I do totally agree that your newsletter and website are your most powerful tools. However, I see the blog as an integral part of the website. It’s always a personal choice what each author does to try and sell a book or two. And it’s getting harder and harder to gain any traction as the market continues to be flooded.
      If you decide to try ads, check out my Story Empire posts about them. It took more than one to cover Facebook. Best wishes for whatever you decide to do!! It’s hard.

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      1. I’ve kept my FB author page precisely because of the ad option, though I haven’t run any. I absolutely have your posts marked for when I’m ready.

        A few years ago, I had a blog schedule for posts five days a week, Monday through Friday. Now, I’m lucky if (with the exception of tours) I post once or twice a month. I haven’t noticed any change in sales because of my decline. Blogs are great for spreading your thoughts and keeping in touch with people, but my audience growth rate leveled off (well before I slowed my post schedule), so I can say blogging doesn’t really impact my sales much. (Other people may have different results.)

        At the end of the day, if a platform (any platform) is one you enjoy, you’ll use it better and it might make a difference. But if you don’t enjoy it, it will become a chore and won’t be an effective tool for you. IMHO. You seem to love blogging, so keep at it! I hope it’s making a difference for you.

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  21. Your post is so timely, Jan. I’d love to follow Larry’s lead and ditch social media. It’s such a distraction for me. After closing my Facebook account several months ago, I’ve found no negative impact on my book sales. A wise person guided me toward focusing more on my newsletter and website since I own those. Social media platforms could disappear leaving those reliant on them for sales high and dry. Great post! I look forward to reading the comments from others.

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    1. You are brave, Jill. I could close my author FB page and never miss it, but my personal page is how I keep up with distant family, so I can’t see ever closing it. I totally agree about your newsletter and website. Those are powerful tools. Thank you so much for weighing in on this big subject! Have a great weekend!

      Liked by 2 people

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