Thursday TREAT! Luckenbach – CD Review @RandyCMoore1 #NewMusic #TexasMusic

Hello, lovely blog followers. I am super excited to bring you a music treat today from my good friend, Randy C. Moore!

Randy is no newcomer. He started his music career at the age of 15. And he’s been at it ever since. Not only is he an enigmatic performer, but he’s also a talented songwriter. Now he has a new CD release that is SO good I have to share. Whatever style of music you gravitate to, you’ll find bits and pieces of it on this new album, Luckenbach!

PURCHASE LINK

The first song, which is the title track, embodies what Luckenbach, Texas is all about. It’s a step away from the rush of everyday life. “We spent too many ticktocks working the time clock, dead on our feet. And too many nights going to bed and just going to sleep….” Then he raises the question, “Do you wanna go to Luckenbach Waylon and Willie and feelin’ no pain…” It’s a toe-tapper and makes you want to get up and dance around the room!

“James Dean Dream” has a great message about allowing the rebel inside you to break free. Living your life based on a truth you believe. It’s not breaking laws and being a bad guy, but being true to your authentic self.

The third track, “A Mother’s Prayer,” goes straight to the heart. Such a heartfelt tribute to the beautiful spirit of mothers and the lifelong bond with their children.

I love the true story, “Before Elvis.” Randy’s Uncle Gene went to Hughes High School in Memphis in 1953 with Elvis Presley. This song is the heart and soul of rockabilly!

In the same rockabilly vein infused with a dose of soul, “Big Bertha” co-written with the late and great Carl Lee Perkins will get you on your feet and moving! “Big Bertha” is actually about a golf club. 🙂

The next song on this album is probably my favorite just because it’s such a heartfelt and moving story. “I’ll Save A Place” is about two brothers and their unbreakable bond. The instrumental arrangement on this one is as rich as decadent chocolate with full strings and piano added. Have a tissue handy when you listen.

“Mosey Off” is a fun song about dying. Oh, wait! Dying is supposed to be sad and morbid. Not the case with this tune. I love the mention of Texas red dirt clay and San Jacinto river mud. Just that line alone is pure visual artistry.

With a bit of sarcasm, “Undertaker” is a rocking tune about the man who claims the body after the soul is gone.

The album closes with a spiritual tune, “Jericho.” What are you going to do when the walls of Jericho tumble? “Are you gonna roll? Are you gonna run…?”

I cannot say enough about this album. Each song is fantastic. The songwriting is superb, the instrumental arrangements are varied and the vocals are smooth and spot-on. It’s a journey from beginning to end, straight from the heart and soul of Randy C. Moore.

I highly recommend that you click over and purchase your copy. Once it’s on your playlist, you’ll find yourself bringing it back up over and over again the way I do!

For a physical copy of the CD, visit Randy C. Moore’s online store

For streaming, go to Amazon ** iTunes

Thank you for helping support this dedicated and hard-working Indie Artist!!

Jan Sikes and Randy C. Moore White Elephant Saloon, Fort Worth, Texas

#SundaySpotlight – The Christmas Album @randymoorehwy59 Randy C Moore #Christmas #Music

It is not often that someone creates a new album of Christmas music that is refreshing and exciting. But Randy C. Moore has accomplished that with his new release he entitled simply, The Christmas Album by Randy C. Moore.

So what can be different about Christmas music? I’ll tell you.

It is the perfect eclectic mix of new and old songs. The album begins with “All I Want for Christmas.” Never before have the words been more relevant than the present day. “All I want for Christmas is peace….” Yep! Me too, Randy!

“Born in a Barn,” is an original by Moore and it is reflective and poignant. A beautiful melody and compelling lyrics make it an easy favorite. “The shepherds and wise men followed his star. They never thought he’d be born in a barn. Oh, the King of all Kings was born in a barn…”

A story song, “A Christmas Day in Memphis” tells of the never-ending heartache of missed love. “So I turn my back, my collar slowly to the wind, try to make it through another cold December day again. Oh, I could flood that Mississippi if I let go of the tears I want to cry. It might be easier to die. When I think about all the things I’m missing on a Christmas day in Memphis…”

Originally a poem penned by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in 1860, “I Heard The Bells on Christmas Day,” is a traditional song. But Moore adds “Ode to Joy” chimes and a vintage 1960’s groove to tell the story. It’s just beautifully done.

The inside Disc of Rancy C. Moore’s The Christmas Album

“I’ll Be Home Next Year” is another original tune from Moore. Taking elements from Moore’s own father’s letters written from overseas military duty, the song builds to a conclusion that brings our hero home for Christmas, but not in the way that we might have wanted it to. “She gazed upon the little card shining in her hand and she read the promise that he wrote one Christmas Eve ago. Next year I’ll be home for Christmas. Next year, you can plan on me. When you think of me this year, fill your heart with Christmas cheer…”

Taking a moment to reflect on the true meaning of the season, “Is This all that Christmas Means?” cuts to the chase. The song begs to ask the question, “have we lost our way to the meaning of Christmas?” The lyrics clearly illustrate how somewhere we’ve lost sight of the true message. Randy’s wish is to lift the heavy load off of Christmas and make it a time of peace on earth. He says, “Skip Black Friday, it’s only gonna let you down, folks.” Yep, I agree with you again, Randy!

On the traditional “Silver Bells,” written by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, Moore brings the song to life as a tribute to his mother, Evelyn. It was her favorite song.

”Stille Nacht, Silent Night” was composed as a Christmas carol by Franz Xaver Gruber in Austria for a Christmas Eve service in 1818. Moore’s arrangement mixes traditional Austrian/German singing with English. I cannot tell you how much this version moved me.

Just when I’m settling into the flow of traditional Christmas music, Moore takes it in an entirely different direction with a rocking “There Ain’t No Santa Clause.” Through the lyrics of this song, he gives a vast amount of substantial evidence to prove the existence of Saint Nicholas. “Well, all I really know is he left me this guitar, so I never will believe there ain’t no Santa Clause…”

Another classic, “The Little Drummer Boy” is the well-known tale of a poor child who wants to give the Christ child a gift at the Nativity. But all he has is a little drum. Moore’s arrangement of the song puts the drum beat front and center, emphasizing its importance. The video below is four years old, but it gives you a glimpse at the richness of Randy C. Moore’s voice.

So, if you are looking for some new Christmas music for the Holiday season, this album is a great choice.

You can purchase a hard copy of the album directly through Randy.

WEBSITE

Or digital copies via:

AMAZON

APPLE MUSIC

CONNECT WITH RANDY ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

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